Friday, Oct 31, 2014
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Economy Of The Song Dynasty


Within the circles of Song Dynasty historiography, both in China and Japan, the current mainstream view is that it is extremely likely that Chinese per capita income experienced unprecedented and considerable increases throughout the Song Dynasty, though differences of opinion remain regarding the magnitude of this increase. Nonetheless, a fair consensus among experts has emerged which contends that both per capita income and population in China experienced unprecedented and considerable increases throughout the Song Dynasty. This observation, as well as a large number of other indicators, has led some scholars to conclude that England was not the first country to experience economic growth. Ronald A. Edwards, an economic historian of China's Song Dynasty, has made this point in a recent paper. The eminent historian of Song Dynasty China, Mark Elvin, has argued that during the Song Dynasty China went through revolutions in farming, water transport, money and credit, market structure and urbanization, and science and technology. Economists have been increasingly pointing to the mounting evidence that England was not the first country to experience increases in both per capita product and population - China's Song Dynasty is arguably the best example. Most notable of these economists is Nobel Prize winner Edward C. Prescott. Others include Kent Deng, Jack Goldstone, Eric L. Jones, Morgan Kelly, Angus Maddison, Stephan L. Parente, Jan de Vries and others.


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